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Florida Catholic newspaper earns five national awards

Florida Keys road trip for religious freedoms

Florida Keys road trip for religious freedoms

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St. Martin de Porres celebra 25 años

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What will Pope Francis do in U.S.?

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Detalles de la visita del Papa Francisco a Cuba en septiembre

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Archbishop Wenski renews fingerprints

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Remembering the departed

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En Misa con la Asociación Cubana de los Caballeros de Malta

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Young adults' 'hearts are ready' for ministry

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On Supreme Court's decision on same-sex marriage

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Supreme Court Decision on Marriage “A Tragic Error”

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¿Son indiferentes los católicos a la música católica?

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Download a copy of Pope Francis' Encyclical here

Download a copy of Pope Francis' Encyclical here

Details finalized for papal pilgrimages

Details finalized for papal pilgrimages

Cath·o·hól·ic

Gospel reading Mark 5:21-43

Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time : June 28, 2015

When Jesus had crossed again in the boat to the other side, a large crowd gathered around him, and he stayed close to the sea. One of the synagogue officials, named Jairus, came forward. Seeing him he fell at his feet and pleaded earnestly with him, saying, “My daughter is at the point of death. Please, come lay your hands on herthat she may get well and live.” He went off with him, and a large crowd followed him and pressed upon him. There was a woman afflicted with hemorrhages for twelve years. She had suffered greatly at the hands of many doctorsand had spent all that she had. Yet she was not helped but only grew worse. She had heard about Jesus and came up behind him in the crowdand touched his cloak. She said, “If I but touch his clothes, I shall be cured.”

Immediately her flow of blood dried up. She felt in her body that she was healed of her affliction. Jesus, aware at once that power had gone out from him, turned around in the crowd and asked, “Who has touched my clothes?” But his disciples said to Jesus, “You see how the crowd is pressing upon you, and yet you ask, ‘Who touched me?’” And he looked around to see who had done it. The woman, realizing what had happened to her, approached in fear and trembling. She fell down before Jesus and told him the whole truth.

Click here to read a brief commentary >>

Father Michael Davis

Church of the little Flower

Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time : June 28, 2015


FROM THE PASTOR'S DESK

Dear Family,

When I was in college seminary, I had a philosophy professor who once said to us, his students: “you are a mere ameba on the radar screen of life. Never see yourself as more important than you are. But remember that even an ameba can infect an environment.” The professor was certainly inviting us to be humble before the mystery of life; but he was also inviting us to be responsible. This, in a very real way, is what Pope Francis is asking the world community to consider through the teaching found in the new papal encyclical, entitled, “Laudato Si” (Praise to you, Lord).

As Saint Francis of Assisi used to walk around the beautiful natural environs of central Italy in admiration and awe of the grandeur of God’s good creation, so, too, we could all benefit from a spirituality of humility and responsibility before the wonders and dignity of the natural order and the mystery of life.

As the moral leader of the world, the Pope is using his office of Petrine leadership to challenge us to get behind our normal routine, to thoughtfully consider “why we do what we do,” to make sure that we are making responsible choices, so that we are fully respecting the beauty, dignity, and interconnectedness of human life and the created world around us. In short, the encyclical invites us to consider our style of life, and it challenges us to deepen our daily reflective awareness of the responsibilities and consequences inherent in human endeavor.

It would be a mistake to presume that the encyclical is simply espousing a particular political ideology or merely some of the tenets of the secular environmentalist movement. We so often think of pollution in terms of issues relative to clean water and clean air, in terms of disposable garbage and recycling, even here in Florida in terms of our coastal environment, the coral reefs, and the everglades. These are certainly important issues that point to a significant social, as well as individual responsibility.

Yet, the encyclical challenges us to get behind these things, to not just acknowledge that the problems exist, but to consider the attitudes and way of life that may cause them. Could a renewed spiritual perspective help? The Pope challenges us to be self-aware, to be thoughtful, mindful moral agents who interact meaningfully, purposefully, and respectfully with God’s good creation, whether it be among our fellow human beings or in regards to the world of nature. Far-sightedness (#36) and a perspective of delicate balance (#37) are needed as we approach this task. I would dare add our common need for humility and responsibility are likewise needed.

I must admit, I was fascinated with how the Holy Father spoke of the notion of “mental pollution,” how the media and the digital world can actually limit our intellectual and spiritual development. The Pope posits that we should not risk losing the wisdom and the intellectual patrimony of the sages of old (#47).

Each of us is, indeed, a “work in progress.” We are all in search of truth, in need of conversion, and the job is never done. The Pope’s new encyclical, “Laudato Si,” seeks to help us get our minds wrapped around the grandeur and enormity of the created world, it resources, and our need for a mindful reflection on our daily choices. One wonders, can we be better “reflective practitioners” of the lives we live and the faith we profess? Can a greater ecological awareness help us in this regard?

Maybe my professor was right. We are mere amebae on the radar screen of life. But let us not forget that even an ameba can infect an environment… for good… or for worse.

Reverend Michael W. Davis

Sacraments: Holy Orders

June 25, 2015

The ministerial or hierarchical priesthood of bishops and priests, and the common priesthood of all the faithful, participate, “each in its own proper way, in the one priesthood of Christ.” While being “ordered one to another,” they differ essentially. (Lumen Gentium 10, Catechism 1547)

In what sense? While the common priesthood of the faithful is exercised by the unfolding of baptismal grace - a life of faith, hope and charity, a life according to the Spirit - the ministerial priesthood is at the service of the common priesthood. It is directed at the unfolding of the baptismal grace of all Christians

The ministerial priesthood is a means by which Christ unceasingly builds up and leads his Church. For this reason, it is transmitted by its own sacrament, the sacrament of Holy Orders

Source: Fountain of Grace, published by archdiocesan Office of Lay Ministry

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